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In-Home Exercise Game To Improve Cognitive Function and Balance in Older Adults

Start: December 22, 2021
End: March 21, 2026
Enrollment: 100

What Is This Study About?

This study will evaluate whether an interactive exercise video game, named iTMT, improves cognition and physical function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment or early dementia. Participants will be randomly assigned to either play the iTMT exercise game at-home while wearing a device to monitor physical activity or at the clinic with in-person supervision. All participants will exercise for two 30-minute sessions a week for three months. At the start and end of the study, participants will complete physical tasks, memory tests, and questionnaires. Researchers will assess any changes in cognitive function, balance, walking speed, and overall quality of life.

Do I Qualify To Participate in This Study?

Minimum Age: 65 Years

Maximum Age: N/A

Must have:

  • Diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or early dementia 
  • Living at home with a primary caregiver 
  • Able to walk at least 30 feet with or without assistance 

Must NOT have:

  • Immobility or major mobility disorder or inability to engage safely in the study exercise program 
  • Diagnosis of severe cognitive impairment with a Montreal Cognitive Assessment score < 20  
  • Any neurological conditions, other than mild cognitive impairment, associated with cognitive impairment 
  • Hearing or vision problems that could interfere with completing study tests 

If I Qualify, Who Do I Contact?

Contact study personnel listed either under the general study contact or the location nearest you.

 
Study Contact
Bijan Najafi, PhD
Maria Noun, BS

Need Help?

Contact NIA’s Alzheimer’s and related Dementias Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center at 800-438-4380 or email ADEAR.

Where Is This Study Located?

Texas
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX 77498
Recruiting
Bijan Najafi, PhD

Who Sponsors This Study?

Lead: Baylor College of Medicine

Source: ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT05235113